A 900-plus acre farm in eastern Henrico County — site of the final battle fought during the Seven Days Battles during the Civil War — is on the market for $10.623 million.

Its sale would be the first time the ownership of the historic Malvern Hill Farm has changed hands since the late 1930s, when William Ferguson bought it.

Nearly two dozen of his family descendants own the property now, but they have decided it is time to part with it, said Bill Barnett, senior vice president and partner with Henrico County-based real estate brokerage Commonwealth Commercial Partners, which is marketing the property along with Ryan Fanelli.

“Some live in the Richmond area, but some live elsewhere including as far away as California,” Barnett said of the family members. “That is a long time for a legacy property.”

The property is mostly north-north east of state Route 5 and east of Curles Neck Farm. Most of the property is in Henrico but some of it is in Charles City County.

A property of this size — in terms of sale price and acreage — typically takes a year or two to sell, Barnett said.

“But we have had some interest, even though it has just come on the market. Some of the folks who have expressed interest are from conservation or preservation motivation. So it could happen sooner rather than later,” he said.

“It is a significant property for several reasons,” Barnett said. “It is very similar to what it appeared like 100 and 200 years ago. It is a large tract and one of the largest in Henrico County. Part of it is an operating farm.”

The most significant is its history. The land was used during three wars — as an encampment used by Marquis de Lafayette in 1781 during the American Revolutionary War; a Virginia militia camp during the War of 1812; and the Battle of Malvern Hill, also known as the Battle of Poindexter’s Farm, fought on July 1, 1862.

The National Park Service might be interested in buying some of the land, he said, because it is within parcels that it has been authorized to acquire.

The property also is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places with the primary dwelling constructed as early as 1662. The house burned down in 1905 but the remains are architecturally significant as one of the few examples of cruciform-plan houses in Virginia.

There are five houses on the property — “two look like country farm houses with a little bit of character. They are not large or estate homes, but they have a sense of place to them,” Barnett said. Three other homes probably were used by tenants or workers, he said.

About one-third of the property is used for farming and has numerous barns and outbuildings with those operations while the remaining land is used for timbering.

“It is so bucolic,” he said. “It is a beautiful place. It is almost park-like in its setting. It is pretty and has a lot of history associated with it.”

Load comments

You must be a full digital subscriber to read this article. You must be a digital subscriber to view this article.

Your sports-only digital subscription does not include access to this section.

SALE!
Only $3 for 3 Months
Unlimited Digital Access

  • Unlimited access to every article, video and piece of online content
  • Exclusive, locally-focused reporting
  • News delivered straight to your inbox via e-newsletters
  • Includes digital delivery of daily e-edition via email
SALE!
Only $3 for 3 Months
Unlimited Digital Access

  • Unlimited access to every article, video and piece of online content
  • Exclusive, locally-focused reporting
  • News delivered straight to your inbox via e-newsletters
  • Includes digital delivery of daily e-edition via email