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Long Island statue honors George H.W. Bush's service dog Sully
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Long Island statue honors George H.W. Bush's service dog Sully

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Sully the service dog

A bronze statue was unveiled on Long Island, where Sully was born and raised before the service dog became the constant companion of former President George H.W. Bush.

SMITHTOWN, N.Y. — Sully the service dog received a special honor on Long Island.

The 4-year-old lab became known for his loyalty to former President George H.W. Bush. Now, Sully is being recognized for his service in a monumental way.

A bronze statue was unveiled Tuesday on Long Island, where Sully was born and raised before the service dog became the constant companion of Bush and then, as the nation watched, stood by the former president at his wake and funeral.

Sully

In this Dec. 4, 2018, file photo, Sully, former President George H.W. Bush's service dog, pays his respect to President Bush as he lies in state at the U.S. Capitol in Washington.

The statue's sculptor, Susan Bahary, said she was so taken with the dog’s loyalty and devotion, she dedicated her art to America’s VetDogs.

“I had the joy of meeting Sully and spending three hours measuring, admiring, getting to know him,” Bahary said.

It costs more than $50,000 to breed, raise, train and place one assistance dog. America’s VetDogs provides its services free of charge.

“The beauty of Sully is that he crosses all barriers,” Sully’s trainer, Valerie Cramer, told CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan. “Maybe he misses the job that he did before, but he is very happy to do what he’s doing now because he touches so many lives.”

Sully now comforts servicemen and women at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., where a line of vets awaits Sully each day.

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Dogs may also have an effect on the human body’s intestinal bacterial population known as the microbiome, because they introduce germs to the home, says Kazi. These microbiome changes may help heart health, an effect similar to that seen when you eat healthy probiotics found in fermented foods.

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