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An American service member who survived the notorious Bataan Death March during World War II but later died in a Japanese prisoner of war camp has finally been accounted for. Military officials announced Friday that the remains of Army Air Forces Pvt. Joseph E. Lescaut, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, were identified in August using mitochondrial DNA analysis as well as dental and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Lescaut was reported captured in the Philippines in 1942. After the 65-mile forced march, he died in July 1942. Lescaut will now be buried in Arlington National Cemetery at a date to be determined.

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A lawsuit against the maker of an anti-malarial drug blamed for causing psychotic and neurological damage in U.S. servicemembers has been thrown out. U.S. District Court Judge Trina Thompson ruled late Monday that the lawsuit doesn't belong in a California court. An Army veteran said Roche Laboratories Inc. and Genentech Inc. intentionally misled the Department of Defense and the Food and Drug Administration about the dangers of mefloquine, the generic version of the drug Lariam. The U.S. military gave the drug to hundreds of thousands of troops sent to Afghanistan and Somalia. The Pentagon eventually replaced the drug with safer alternatives.

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A Cabinet minister says Pakistan’s premier has named the country's former spy chief as head of the army. The military has historically wielded huge political influence in Pakistan, ruling the country for half of its 75-year history. It also oversees Pakistan's nuclear program. Thursday's announcement says Gen. Asim Munir will replace Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, whose extended six-year term ends on Nov. 29. Munir begins his new role at a time of heightened political turmoil due to months of bitter feuding between Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif and his predecessor, former Prime Minister Imran Khan.

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The intense firefight over Ukraine has the Pentagon rethinking its weapons stockpiles. If another major war broke out today, would the U.S. have enough ammunition to fight? It’s a question confronting Pentagon planners, not only as they aim to supply Ukraine for a war with Russia that could stretch years longer, but also as they look ahead to a potential conflict with China. U.S. defense production lines aren't scaled to supply a major land war. And some lines, like for the Stinger anti-aircraft missiles, were previously shut down. That’s putting pressure on U.S. weapons reserves and has officials asking whether U.S. stockpiles are big enough.

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Officials say Ukraine could face rolling blackouts through March because Russian airstrikes have caused what they call “colossal” damage to the power grid. To cope in the harsh winter, authorities are urging Ukrainians to stock up on supplies and evacuate hard-hit areas. Russia has been pummeling Ukraine’s power grid and other infrastructure for weeks. That onslaught has caused widespread blackouts and deprived millions of Ukrainians of electricity, heat and water. The head of Ukraine's power grid operator says the attacks have damaged practically every thermal and hydroelectric power plant. In another development, the United States announced $4.5 billion in aid to bolster Ukraine's economic stability and support core government services.

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The Colombian government and the South American country’s largest remaining guerrilla group have resumed peace negotiations, breaking a roughly four-year hiatus during which the rebels have expanded the territory where they operate. Neighboring Venezuela on Monday hosted representatives of the National Liberation Army and the government of Colombian President Gustavo Petro. The discussions in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas come more than a month after the rebels and Petro’s government announced the resumption of negotiations. The National Liberation Army was founded in the 1960s by students, union leaders and priests who were inspired by Cuba’s revolution. The group is believed to have about 4,000 fighters in Colombia.

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The top U.S. military officer says he tried to reach out to his Russian counterpart in the aftermath of the missile explosions in Poland, but wasn’t able to get through. Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said his staff tried to get Russia's top military official Gen. Valery Gerasimov on the phone to discuss the incident with “no success.” Milley didn’t elaborate on the efforts, but the lack of communications, at a time when there were questions about whether Russia had launched a missile at a NATO ally, raises concerns about high-level U.S.-Russian communications in a crisis.

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A U.S. government agency is being sued over its decision to allow a proposed mine outside the vast Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge to move forward without federal permits. The Southern Environmental Law Center filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court against the Army Corps of Engineers, saying its August decision on the mining project in Georgia contradicts the Corps' own policies and violates federal law. Twin Pines Minerals has been working since 2019 to establish a mine outside the wildlife refuge. Scientists have warned the project could damage the swamp. The Army Corps declined to comment on the lawsuit. Washington rule changes have caused the agency to flip-flop on whether wetlands at the site fall under its jurisdiction.

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Authorities say Ukrainian police officers and TV and radio broadcasts are returning to the southern city of Kherson following the withdrawal of Russian troops. The chief of the National Police of Ukraine said 200 officers were at work in the city, setting up checkpoints and documenting evidence of possible war crimes. He says police teams also were working to identify and neutralize unexploded ordnance, and one sapper was injured. Ukraine’s communications watchdog said national TV and radio broadcasts had resumed. Yet an adviser to Kherson’s mayor described the situation in the city after more than eight months of Russian occupation as “a humanitarian catastrophe.” He said residents desperately needed water, medicine and food.

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Ukraine’s president says that special military units have entered the city of Kherson. President Volodymyr Zelenskyy made the announcement Friday in a video address hours after Russia said it had completed withdrawing troops from the strategically key city. Zelenskyy said that “as of now, our defenders are approaching the city. In quite a bit, we are going to enter. But special units are already in the city."

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Philippine troops have forged a ceasefire with Muslim guerrillas after 10 combatants were killed in clashes in a southern village and frantic efforts were made to prevent an escalation that could threaten a major peace accord. The sporadic clashes erupted Tuesday and Wednesday in Ulitan village on the island province of Basilan, where emergency talks arranged by government and rebel mediators led to an indefinite ceasefire agreement late Thursday between army troops and Moro Islamic Liberation Front rebel commanders. The clashes left three soldiers dead and 15 others wounded, regional military spokesman Lt. Col. Abdurasad Sirajan said. The rebels reported seven insurgents dead and six others wounded. The conflict underscored the fragility of law and order in the country's south.

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Russia says it has begun withdrawing troops from a strategic Ukrainian city in a potential turning point in the grinding war.  A Ukrainian official warned that land mines the retreating Russians left behind could make Kherson a “city of death.” A forced pullout would mark one of Russia’s worst setbacks since it invaded Ukraine. Ukrainian forces seem to be scoring more battlefield successes elsewhere in the Kherson region and closing in on the city. President Volodymyr Zelenskky said Thursday the pace has increased so much that residents are checking hourly where his forces have raised the national flag. Zelenskyy said his forces were racing to remove land mines from 170,000 square meters (65,637 square miles) nationwide, including from Kherson.

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Protests in Iran have raged on streets with demonstrators remembering a bloody crackdown in the country’s southeast. That's even as the nation’s intelligence minister and an army official renewed threats against local dissent and the broader world. The protests in Iran, sparked by the Sept. 16 death of a 22-year-old woman after her detention by the country’s morality police, has grown into one of the largest sustained challenges to the nation’s theocracy since the chaotic months after its 1979 Islamic Revolution. Activists say at least 328 people have been killed and 14,825 others arrested in the unrest. The demonstrations continued into Thursday morning in the country.

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The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff says Russia's announced retreat from Kherson in southern Ukraine and a potential stalemate in fighting over the winter could provide both countries an opportunity to negotiate peace. Army Gen. Mark Milley says “well over 100,000 Russian soldiers" have been killed or wounded, with similar figures on the Ukrainian side. He says as many as 40,000 Ukrainian civilians have been killed. Milley made the remarks at The Economic Club of New York on Wednesday.

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Democratic incumbent Sen. Maggie Hassan did better than she did in her 2016 race in New Hampshire. She also did better with moderate voters. That's according to the results of an Associated Press survey of American voters aimed at determining why they voted how they did. That insight helped allow the AP to declare Hassan the victor over former Army Brig. Gen. Don Bolduc. Hassan is a former governor who's now won her second term in the Senate. The Republican candidate Bolduc had said the 2020 election was stolen from former President Donald Trump before softening that stance.

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U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan has won a second term, defeating Republican challenger Don Bolduc in New Hampshire. Hassan was formerly the state’s governor and had been viewed as vulnerable given her narrow win in 2016. But her odds improved after popular Gov. Chris Sununu declined to challenge her, and Republicans nominated Bolduc. He is a retired Army general who has espoused conspiracy theories about vaccines and the 2020 presidential election. She argued he couldn’t be trusted to protect abortion rights despite his recent opposition to a national ban and emphasized what she called extreme views on Social Security and other issues.

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A Libyan military commander who once lived in Virginia has been deposed in a U.S. lawsuit in which he is accused of orchestrating indiscriminate attacks on civilians and torturing and killing political opponents. That's according to the Libyan American Alliance, which supports one of three lawsuits against Khalifa Hifter. The deposition took place Sunday. Plaintiffs have for years sought to question the commander of the self-styled Libyan National Army about his role in fighting that has plagued Libya over the last decade. Hifter and his family own property in Virginia that could be used to satisfy any judgment against him. Hifter submitted an affidavit saying the lawsuits are being used against him by his political opponents.

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A Libyan military commander who once lived in Virginia has been deposed in a U.S. lawsuit in which he is accused of orchestrating indiscriminate attacks on civilians and torturing and killing political opponents. That's according to the Libyan American Alliance, which supports one of three lawsuits against Khalifa Hifter. The deposition took place Sunday. Plaintiffs have for years sought to question the commander of the self-styled Libyan National Army about his role in fighting that has plagued Libya over the last decade. Hifter and his family own property in Virginia that could be used to satisfy any judgment against him. Hifter submitted an affidavit saying the lawsuits are being used against him by his political opponents.

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