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The FBI’s unprecedented search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida residence is ricocheting around government, politics and a polarized country. Trump and his allies are complaining, and others are wondering Tuesday why the Justice Department — notably cautious under Attorney General Merrick Garland — decided to take such a drastic step. The FBI searched Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate as part of an investigation into whether he took classified records there from the White House. That’s according to people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation. Trump says agents opened a safe at his home, and he likens their search to “prosecutorial misconduct.”

Shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine, big tech firms and the European Union moved to ban the country's main propaganda and disinformation channels. Nearly six months later, the number of sites pushing that same content has exploded. That's according to a new report from a tech firm, NewsGuard, that tracks disinformation. NewsGuard has identified 250 websites actively working to spread Kremlin disinformation. In some cases, Russia's propaganda agencies merely rebrand the content with a new name and logo before reposting it from new accounts. Experts say the ease with which Russia has evaded bans on its content show a need for more a aggressive approach by governments and tech companies.

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Ryan Fellows, star of the Discovery Channel’s racing show “Street Outlaws: Fastest in America,” was killed in a car crash Sunday, the show confirmed on social media. “The Street Outlaws family is heartbroken by the accident that led to the tragic death of Ryan Fellows,” the statement read on Twitter. “We extend our deepest sympathy to Ryan’s loved ones as they process this sudden and ...

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Kanye West showed no mercy after Kim Kardashian and Pete Davidson’s breakup. The rapper on Monday shared an Instagram photo of a fake newspaper headline reading “Skete Davidson dead at age 28.” The post came three days after reports surfaced that Kardashian and Davidson were done after nine months of dating. West, who was married to Kardashian from 2014 until their split in 2021, publicly took ...

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The head of Amnesty International’s Ukraine chapter has resigned, saying the human rights organization shot down her opposition to publishing a report that claimed Ukrainian forces had exposed civilians to Russian attacks by basing themselves in populated areas. In a statement issued Friday night, Oksana Pokalchuk accused her former employer of disregarding concerns of local staff members who had pushed for the report to be reworked. The report released Thursday drew angry denouncements from top Ukrainian officials, who accused the authors of equating the Ukrainian military’s defensive actions to the tactics of the invading Russians. Russia has justified attacks on civilian areas by alleging that Ukrainian fighters had firing positions at the targeted locations.

Twitter says vulnerability in its software that exposed an undetermined number of owners of anonymous accounts to potential identity compromise last year was apparently exploited by a malicious actor. It did not confirm a report that data on 5.4 million users was offered for sale online as a result but said users worldwide were affected. The breach is especially worrisome because many Twitter account owners, including human rights activists, do not disclose their identities in their profiles for security reasons that include fear of persecution by repressive authorities. The company recommended users seeking to keep their identities veiled not add a publicly known phone number or email address to their Twitter account.

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A woman who fueled a social media frenzy with claims about police being involved in the killings of two Alabama teens found dead in a car trunk in 1999 now says she was lying the whole time. WTYV-TV reports that 53-year-old Rena Crumb recanted her allegations on Thursday. Her testimony came during a pretrial hearing for Coley McCraney, who is charged with capital murder in the slayings of J.B. Beasley and Tracie Hawlett more than two decades ago. The defense hoped Crumb's testimony about police wrongdoing could help clear their client. But after repeatedly saying she couldn’t recall certain things, Crumb blurted out: “I lied.”

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: All ballots at a Detroit ballot counting site went through the necessary signature review process, and bags pictured on the floor of the facility contained election workers' belongings. A U.S. congressional bill would not turn current semi-automatic weapon owners into felons. Health experts and officials say monkeypox can be transmitted to anyone, not just gay and bisexual men, and immigrants are not receiving Social Security numbers at the U.S. border.

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Grammy-winning country trio Lady A is postponing its tour this year as band member Charles Kelley focuses on sobriety. The group said in a social media post that the band would be “taking time with the support their families and team of professionals to walk through this together.” The band that is composed of Kelley, Hillary Scott and Dave Haywood was due to start the tour in August in Nashville. The band says in a social media post that it will tour next year. The band was previously known as Lady Antebellum before changing its name in 2020.

Facebook owner Meta is quietly curtailing some safeguards designed to thwart voting misinformation or foreign interference in elections even as the U.S. midterms approach. The pivot is raising alarm about Meta’s priorities and how some might exploit the world’s most popular social media platforms to spread misleading claims, launch fake accounts and rile up extremists. Public communication about the company’s plans to combat election misinformation has gone quiet. Ahead of the 2018 and 2020 elections, the company released more than 30 statements about how it would stifle U.S. election misinformation and divisive hate speech. Menlo Park, California-based Meta says policies developed around election misinformation or foreign interference are now hard-wired into company operations.

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Federal prosecutors are recommending an eight-year prison sentence for an off-duty Virginia police officer who was convicted by a jury of storming the U.S. Capitol. In a court filing Thursday, prosecutors say former Rocky Mount Police Sgt. Thomas Robertson used his law enforcement training to block police officers who were trying to protect the Capitol from a mob’s attack on Jan. 6, 2021. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper is scheduled to sentence Robertson next Thursday. An eight-year prison sentence would be the longest among hundreds of Capitol riot cases. The lengthiest so far is seven years and three months.

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Federal prosecutors are recommending an eight-year prison sentence for an off-duty Virginia police officer who was convicted by a jury of storming the U.S. Capitol. In a court filing Thursday, prosecutors say former Rocky Mount Police Sgt. Thomas Robertson used his law enforcement training to block police officers who were trying to protect the Capitol from a mob’s attack on Jan. 6, 2021. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper is scheduled to sentence Robertson next Thursday. An eight-year prison sentence would be the longest among hundreds of Capitol riot cases. The lengthiest so far is seven years and three months.

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Elon Musk accused Twitter of fraud in a countersuit over his aborted $44 billion deal for the social media company, which he said held back necessary information and misled his team about its true user base. According to The Washington Post, the countersuit filed by the billionaire and Tesla CEO filed on Thursday alleges that Twitter committed fraud, breach of contract and violation of the Texas Securities Act. The Wall Street Journal reported that Musk’s counterclaims were filed confidentially last week and unsealed in a filing late Thursday at the Delaware Chancery Court.

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Police in Minnesota confirm three gunshots were fired at the Mall of America in suburban Minneapolis, but say no one appears to have been hurt. Bloomington police say they are searching for two people. Video posted to social media showed what appeared to be a man shouting as he walked near the complex’s Nike store, with three apparent gunshots. A mall spokesman says the mall will reopen Friday with more mall security and police on site. The mall, which opened in 1992, is the largest in the U.S. and is a tourist destination and community gathering spot.

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Twitter denied in a court filing that it had deprived its would-be acquirer, billionaire and Tesla CEO Elon Musk, of necessary information or misrepresented details about its business. Musk originally made those charges to justify his attempt to back out of a $44 billion deal to buy the social platform. In a counterclaim filed Thursday, Twitter calls Musk's reasoning “a story, imagined in an effort to escape a merger agreement that Musk no longer found attractive.” Musk's counterclaim, which Twitter is responding to, has not been made public. A judge ruled on Wednesday that it will be made public by Friday.

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An Alaska newspaper reports that two Anchorage police officers violated department policy during a traffic stop last month when a woman in town for a rally by former President Donald Trump showed a “white privilege card” instead of a driver’s license and was not ticketed. However, the Anchorage Daily News reports it’s not clear what policy was violated or what disciplinary actions, if any, the officers faced because the department is treating it as a confidential personnel matter. Mimi Israelah says she was heading for a pizza after arriving in Anchorage when she was pulled over for weaving. She couldn’t find her license but handed a novelty “white privilege card” to officers. A video she shot shows one officer replying, “That’s hilarious.”

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Alyssa Farah Griffin, a former Trump administration spokeswoman who broke from her old boss in 2020, will be the conservative voice on the daytime talk show “The View.” She replaces Meghan McCain, who left last summer after four years on the show and complained afterward about a toxic workplace. “The View” also named another Republican Trump foe and frequent guest on the show, Ana Navarro, as a regular panelist. Although Farah Griffin now regularly speaks out against Donald Trump, some are not willing to accept her because of her service to the administration and are calling online to boycott the show.

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A Black resident of Buffalo, New York, told federal investigators he anonymously tweeted out a fake threat to commit mass killings against Black people in his community, days after the May 14 shooting at a Buffalo Tops supermarket, because he wanted to see if racists would cheer him on. The U.S. Attorney's office said Thursday the 24-year-old suspect tweeted that he and associates would target Black people at area grocery stores. He faces up to five years in prison if convicted of making an interstate threat. He was released after his initial court appearance Thursday.

An Airbnb listing in Mississippi advertised as a “slave cabin” has been removed from the site following backlash on social media. Airbnb apologized after a TikTok video went viral criticizing the description of a cottage in Greenville. The bed and breakfast was marketed as an “1830s slave cabin.” Wynton Yates, a Black lawyer from New Orleans, made a video criticizing the listing. The video has been viewed over 2.7 million times. Airbnb says it removed the Mississippi listing from its site and is doing the same for other listings known to include former slave quarters in the United States.

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The day before Kansas voters rejected a ballot question that could have eroded abortion rights, many people in the state reported receiving anonymous text messages with misleading information about the vote. The texts urged recipients to vote “yes” to support choice, but voting that way would actually have empowered lawmakers to restrict or even outlaw abortion. The tactic reflects the growing use of text messages to spread disinformation about voting and politics. Experts say text messages can be just as effective or even more effective than social media when it comes to disseminating falsehoods, and the anonymity of wireless communication can make it much harder to identify the source. Kansas voters on Tuesday ended up rejecting the measure.

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